“On one side of the border lies the modern world: the internet, homecoming dances, cell phones. On the other side dwell the ancient monsters who spark humanity’s deepest fears: dragons.

Seventeen-year-old Kay Wyatt knows she’s breaking the law by rock climbing near the border, but she’d rather have an adventure than follow the rules. When the dragon Artegal unexpectedly saves her life, the rules are abruptly shattered, and a secret friendship grows between them.

But suspicion and terror are the legacy of human and dragon inter­actions, and the fragile truce that has maintained peace between the species is unraveling. As tensions mount and battles begin, Kay and Artegal are caught in the middle. Can their friendship change the course of a war?

In her young-adult debut, New York Times bestselling author Carrie Vaughn presents a distinctly twenty-first-century tale of myths and machines, and an alliance that crosses a seemingly unbridgeable divide.” 

I have to say this is going to be one of my favs for the year. Its sort of a Romeo/Juliet with out the love but just a friendship. It is also like Aragon, in the learning to ride although Kay doesn’t get the special powers when she rides Artegal.
Pretty much the book is about how humans are afraid of dragons and how they are willing to start a war and the only human who has talked to a dragon in a really long time is Kay and how she may be able to stop the war with Artegal at her side. If she able to talk to him. Lesson to learn: Don’t be afraid and hate something that you don/t understand.

LOVED IT!

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Two girls who have a bet to be that skinnest in school. One dies…. all alone in a motel. Lia is haunted… by her.

Must not eat. Must not eat. Must not eat. Must not eat. Must not eat. Must not eat. Must not eat.

The shadowghosts are talking to her. The only way to let them free is to cut, cut, cut them free.

Must not eat. Must not eat. Must not eat. Must not eat. Must not eat. Must not eat. Must not eat.

Lia is now a wintergirl and Cassie died because she was one too….

Lia’s guilty but she doesn’t know what to do…

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33

She called 33 times and you didn’t answer!

She died because of you!

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Ben Tomlin is an only child. But all that changes when his mother brings home Zan – an eight-day-old chimpanzee. Ben’s father has moved the family from Toronto to Victoria to pursue his latest research project, an experiment to determine whether chimpanzees can acquire advanced language skills. Zan will be treated as a family member and Ben’s parents tell him he has a new brother. What happens is an interesting story of family dynamics. This young adult novel is special. The writing is wonderful with loads of humor and heart and the interaction between Ben and Zan is touching. There is so much that is good about this book. Oppel scores another writing winner!
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Happy Teen Read Week, Niles Teens!
Last month you joined more than 8,000 teens from around the country to choose your favorite books from the past year. Here are the results.
The 2010 Teens’ Top Ten is:
Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
City of Glass by Cassandra Clare
Heist Society by Ally Carter
Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater
Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick
Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl
Along for the Ride by Sarah Dessen
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Fire by Kristin Cashore
Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson

Teens visit www.ala.org/teenread and vote on next year’s theme (Picture It @ your library, Feast on Reads @ your library, or Cloak and Dagger@ your library
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Welcome to the Book Bowl. The Niles Teen Advisory Board christened the Young Adult Fiction Area the Teen Alley. All reviews are welcome! I started the ball rolling with a review of Mockingjay.
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Mockingjay is heartbreaking with its honest portrayal of the cost of revolutionary action against the Capitol. Who are the good guys and who will live or die kept me fixated until I finished. Collins writes with pinpoint precision with the same accuracy that Katniss displays with a bow and arrow.

Mockingjay moves in military precision in drills of brutality, tenderness, calculation, strategy, horror, and heartbreak. Collins’s background as a screenwriter is evident. The fast pacing, the quick settings change and the dialogue are all geared toward the visual. The author makes your care what will happen to all the characters in the trilogy, especially Katniss. Katniss’s humanity serves as a foil to the cold cruelty of the Capitol. Throughout her war weary exploits she wears her sensitivity, independence and vulnerability. The personal conversations and interactions between the characters are brilliantly written.

Collins is no stranger to the horrors of war since her father taught at West Point and served in Vietnam. After a while I thought how does she come up with all these ghastly ideas for evil and torture. In the last heartbreaking disaster, I was reminded of the famous picture from Vietnam with a child on fire from a napalm bomb. Horrific events continue in war after war and Mockingjay follows this realism.

The Hunger Games trilogy, Hunger Games, Catching Fire and Mockingjay, hits hard and after reading all of them I felt stunned. Although I would have favored a few more characters spared, Mockingjay ends the trilogy with a believable conclusion.
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