home_alone

The image above is probably embedded in every kids and adults mind alike that it hardly warrants guessing where it came from if you’ve watched the movie from your childhood or for the first time.

This hit family holiday comedy is a feel good movie for all ages!

Aside from being one of my all time favorite holiday movies, it deserves to be on the list of top classic holiday movies. Its multiple themes of togetherness, forgiveness, and most importantly family, transcends time itself and still plays on till this day. Though it premiered in November of 1990, the movie itself does not get tiring. Though the laughs may wane a little after watching the “Wet Bandits”, played by Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern, encounter the various booby traps–which I alone admit to actually recreating my own battle plans when I was small–the end result is still pretty darn hilarious.

The plot of the movie is simple: Eight-year-old Kevin McCallister gets left home alone after his family accidentally leaves him behind due to a mishap at the beginning of the movie, which I will not spoil, but is pretty ridiculous that you forget about it after watching the whole movie. He is forced to defend himself and his home after the two bumbling burglars sets their sights on their property. Amidst all the gags and the action that most of the comedy derives from, the emotional core of the movie and the music itself elevates it to a whole different experience.

At its core, it’s a heartwarming tale that tugs at the strings mainly because of the mother’s attempt to get home to her little boy. You’ll find yourself cheerful, festive, smiling, and maybe develop a slight “lump” in your throat after the movie.

So if you find yourself stuck with nothing to watch during the holiday season, pick yourself up a copy of the movie or put it on hold here. We also have the movie on Blu-ray here. Trust me, you won’t regret it.

 

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MOTION PICTURES

Best Drama
12 Years a Slave
Captain Phillips
Gravity
Philomena
Rush

Best Musical/Comedy
American Hustle
Her
Inside Lleweyn Davis
Nebraska
The Wolf of Wall Street

Best Director
Alfonso Cuaron, Gravity
Paul Greengrass, Captain Phillips
Steve McQueen, 12 Years a Slave
Alexander Payne, Nebraska
David O. Russell, American Hustle

Best Actress in a Drama
Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine
Sandra Bullock, Gravity
Judi Dench, Philomena
Emma Thompson, Saving Mr. Banks
Kate Winslet, Labor Day

Best Actor in a Drama
Chiwetel Ejiofor, 12 Years a Slave
Idris Elba, Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom
Tom Hanks, Captain Phillips
Matthew McConaughey, Dallas Buyer’s Club
Robert Redford, All Is Lost

Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy
Christian Bale, American Hustle
Bruce Dern, Nebraska
Leonardo Di Caprio, The Wolf of Wall Street
Oscar Isaac, Inside Llewyn Davis
Joaquin Phoenix, Her

Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy
Amy Adams, American Hustle
Julie Delpy, Before Midnight
Greta Gerwig, Frances Ha
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Enough Said
Meryl Streep, August: Osage County

Best Supporting Actress
Sally Hawkins, Blue Jasmine
Jennifer Lawrence, American Hustle
Lupita Nyong’o, 12 Years a Slave
Julia Roberts, August: Osage County
June Squibb, Nebraska

Best Supporting Actor
Barkhad Abdi, Captain Phillips
Daniel Bruhl, Rush
Bradley Cooper, American Hustle
Michael Fassbender, 12 Years a Slave
Jared Leto, Dallas Buyer’s Club

Best Screenplay
Spike Jonze, Her
Bob Nelson, Nebraska
Jeff Pope/Steve Coogan, Philomena
John Ridley, 12 Years a Slave
Eric Warren Singer, David O. Russell, American Hustle

Best Foreign Language Film
Blue is the Warmest Color
The Great Beauty
The Hunt
The Past
The Wind Rises

Best Animated Feature
The Croods
Despicable Me 2
Frozen

Best Original Song
“Atlas,” The Hunger Games, Catching Fire
“Let It Go,” Frozen
“Ordinary Love,” Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom
“Please Mr. Kennedy,” Inside Llewyn Davis
“Sweeter Than Fiction,” One Chance

Best Score
Alex Ebert, All Is Lost
Alex Heffes, Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom
Steven Price, Gravity
John Williams, The Book Thief
Hans Zimmer, 12 Years a Slave

TELEVISION

Best TV Comedy or Musical
Girls
Modern Family
Parks and Recreation
The Big Bang Theory
Brooklyn Nine-Nine

Best TV Drama
Breaking Bad
Downton Abbey
The Good Wife
House of Cards
Masters of Sex

Best Actress in a TV Drama
Julianna Marguiles, The Good Wife
Tatiana Maslany, Orphan Black
Taylor Schilling, Orange Is the New Black
Kerry Washington, Scandal
Robin Wright, House of Cards

Best Actress in a TV Comedy
Zooey Deschanel, New Girl
Lena Dunham, Girls
Edie Falco, Nurse Jackie
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep
Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation

Best Actor in a TV Drama
Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad
Liev Schreiber, Ray Donovan
Michael Sheen, Masters of Sex
Kevin Spacey, House of Cards
James Spader, The Blacklist

Best Actor in a TV Comedy
Jason Bateman, Arrested Development
Don Cheadle, House of Lies
Michael J. Fox, The Michael J. Fox Show
Jim Parsons, The Big Bang Theory
Andy Samberg, Brooklyn Nine-Nine

Best Miniseries or TV Movie
American Horror Story: Coven
Behind the Candelabra
Dancing on the Edge
Top of the Lake
White Queen

Best Actress in a Miniseries or TV Movie
Helena Bonham Carter, Burton and Taylor
Rebecca Ferguson, White Queen
Jessica Lange, American Horror Story
Helen Mirren, Phil Spector
Elisabeth Moss, Top of the Lake

Best Actor in a Miniseries or TV Movie
Matt Damon, Behind the Candelabra
Michael Douglas, Behind the Candelabra
Chiwetel Ejiofor, Dancing on the Edge
Idris Elba, Luther
Al Pacino, Phil Spector

Best Supporting Actress in a TV Show, Miniseries or TV Movie
Jacqueline Bisset, Dancing on the Edge
Janet McTeer, White Queen
Hayden Panettiere, Nashville
Monica Potter, Parenthood
Sofia Vergara, Modern Family

Best Supporting Actor in a TV Show, Miniseries or TV Movie
Josh Charles, The Good Wife
Rob Lowe, Behind the Candelabra
Aaron Paul, Breaking Bad
Corey Stoll, House of Cards
Jon Voight, Ray Donovan

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1 comment.

Since Boston has been on our minds lately, I thought of featuring some Boston-set movies.  These films are all set in the historical city.  Some do not depict Boston in the best light, but nonetheless, they showcase the many facets of Beantown.

Bluehill Avenue. R. 2001.
The Boondock Saints II: All Saints Day. R. 2009.
The Boondock Saints. Not Rated. 1999.
The Bostonians. Not Rated. 1984.
Children of Invention. Not Rated. 2009.
A Civil Action. PG-13. 1998.
Coma. PG. 1978.
The Departed. R. 2006.
Edge of Darkness. R. 2010.
Fear Strikes Out. Not Rated. 1956.
Fever Pitch. PG-13. 2005.
The Friends of Eddie Coyle. R. 1973.
Gone Baby Gone. R. 2007.
My Best Friend’s Girl. R. 2008.
Mystic River. R. 2003.
Saint Ralph. PG-13. 2004.
The Thomas Crown Affair. R. 1968.
3 Americas. Not Rated. 2008.
The Town. R. 2010. (also on blu-ray)

 

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Today, with the passing of Roger Ebert, is a very sad day indeed.  Ebert was a national treasure…in the film world and in popular culture.  Whether you agreed with him or not, he always seemed to command a level of respect among his peers and among the public.  It is a great loss.  NO ONE will be able to replace him.  Other have tried…but never succeeded and never will. 

I used to always say I agreedmore with Gene Siskel, Ebert’s longtime TV film critic partner…but I liked Ebert more.  I could say that the main reason for this was that he was a Pulitzer Award winner.  OR that he worked for a more “of the people” paper – The Sun Times.  But, in my heart, as a big gal myself, I think it has to do with his size.  Yes, his size.  Ebert was more human and more approachable to folks because he was a normal guy.  Also, the media always used to poke fun at him for being chubby and he used to take it in stride…with good humor and class.  I think folks found that endearing.  Siskel even used to make fun of his girth and I think people never liked that.  Ebert was the one that more people probably would have wanted to have a drink with…or see a movie with.   
And, as a filmie, Ebert did a lot for film and the  art of cinema. Siskel just used to write reviews.  Ebert’s passion for movies used to come through the page…and also through his many books on film.  In 1997, he began writing articles in The Sun Times entitled THE GREAT MOVIES…which was classic films he loved and cherished.  He wrote so many of these “great movie” articles that he eventually compiled them into books.  Basically, Ebert just loved movies…new movies, classic movies, foreign films, and everything in between. 
Goodbye, Roger.  You will be missed much more than you know!
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Daniel Day-LewisLincoln {“Abraham Lincoln”}
Hugh JackmanLes Misérables {“Jean Valjean”}
Joaquin PhoenixThe Master {“Freddie Quell”}
Denzel WashingtonFlight {“Whip Whitaker”}
Alan ArkinArgo {“Lester Siegel”}
Philip Seymour HoffmanThe Master {“Lancaster Dodd”}
Tommy Lee JonesLincoln {“Thaddeus Stevens”}
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Christoph WaltzDjango Unchained {“Dr. King Schultz”}
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Emmanuelle RivaAmour {“Anne”}
Naomi WattsThe Impossible {“Maria”}
Amy AdamsThe Master {“Peggy Dodd”}
Sally FieldLincoln {“Mary Todd Lincoln”}
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Anne HathawayLes Misérables {“Fantine”}
Helen HuntThe Sessions {“Cheryl”}
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NoChile
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“Before My Time” from Chasing IceMusic and Lyric by J. Ralph
“Everybody Needs A Best Friend” from TedMusic by Walter Murphy; Lyric by Seth MacFarlane
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