Poster for Musical High SchoolWelcome to Adequate High School in Adequate, Oregon. The school motto is “Keep it adequate!” and the school cheer is “OKAAAY!” The drama club tries to stage a production of the muscial Mint Green Tap Shoes,  and in the words of Playbill writer and cast member Robbie, they face a lot of challenges. Gabrielle says, “Come for the laughs and good memories. “This play is a lot about accepting people for who they are!” says Rohini.

Click here to register for our premier (and only) performance. Don’t miss out!

When: Saturday, July 20 @ 11 am

Where: Large Meeting Room, 6960 Oakton St.

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Join us at the Niles Public Library this Saturday (July 21) for a performance of an original play that has been written and produced by local teens! The Dinklebergs: Road Trip to Nowhere is a 30-minute comedy about a family road trip gone awry. Teenage hipster Brent introduces us to his quirky family: Mom’s obsessed with Twilight, his sister Melissa is obsessed with his best friend, Grandma and Grandpa (or Glozelle & Papa G, as they prefer to be called) refuse to act their age, and Dad doesn’t care about anything. Soon they’re stuck in the car on the way to a family reunion in far off Ar-Kan-Sas, and the GPS is acting a little strangely…

When: July 21, at 11:00am
Where: Large Meeting Room, 6960 W. Oakton St. Niles.

Click Here to Register!

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Annette Bening is just plain classy…as a woman, as an actress, as a working mother, etc. Her role in Being Julia is about a classy stage actress in 1930s London. Does the character resemble the real life woman? Well, honestly I don’t know since I am not on personal terms with Ms. Bening. But, I’m assuming, just on the basis that both are famous, well-respected actresses, that there are some parallels. Bening plays Julia Lambert, a spoiled, middle-aged West End (London’s “Broadway”) goddess used to getting her way. She is in a sexless marriage with her husband, played by Jeremy Irons, who also is her stage producer. Their marriage is more of a matter of convenience and business than one of love. So, when she takes up with a younger man, the void of love in her life is filled. Or is it? I know—sounds boring and more like an installment of Masterpiece Theatre than a captivating film. But, boring is the last thing this film is. Trust me. And, that’s mostly due to Bening and her marvelous performance. She brings light and air into Julia…humor when necessary and a sense of doom when called for. In the film, Julia is questioned on whether she is being true to her emotions or if she is just “acting.” I, for one, never knew the answer to that and really didn’t care. Bening is so convincing as Julia that the lines become intertwined between “real life” and “the stage.”

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An American businessman (Cary Grant) visiting London falls in love with a London stage actress (Ingrid Bergman). The only problem is that he is married…or is he? This confusion leads to a hilarious ending of mistaken identity and comical twists. This is Grant and Bergman’s second pairing (the first being 1946’s Notorious). Years have not affected this duo’s chemistry at all, allowing them to portray characters just as passionate and in love as they did over a decade earlier.

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Wait for a bumpy night and put this classic zinger on. This film revitalized Bette Davis’ ailing career and as soon as she speaks in this one, you will know it’s a performance she was born to play. Davis plays an acclaimed and long-standing Broadway actress who is the object of a wannabe starlet’s attention. At first, it seems the young upstart is just that…someone who is in awe at Davis’ mere presence. As the film goes on, we come to find out she’s much more than an impressionable, naive girl. The young girl, played by Anne Baxter, is great but Davis steals this movie right out from under her. Yes, this is the film that coined the phrase, “Fasten your seatbelts, it’s going to be a bumpy night.” And one could say the same about Davis’ performance here…strap yourself in because you will be surprised.

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A classic Hitchcock film that has a perfect cast but somehow doesn’t get the due it deserves. Made at the end of what I would call one of Hitchcock’s “off” periods (his biggest stinker Under Capricorn comes right before this one in 1949 and in 1951, Hitchcock makes Strangers on a Train which saves his ailing career). This film features many of the trademarks Hitchcock aficionados have come to know and love in his later films…the “wronged” man, the love interest, fair amounts of humor for comic relief, and a thrilling ending. So, why is it not up there with Rear Window and North by Northwest? Well, it’s not glitzy. Even though it’s about the theatre industry in London, it doesn’t shine like Hitchcock’s better-known works. I would say that has to do mostly with the acting. All of the performances here seem adequate but not stunning. Wyman and Sim are spot-on when playing the father-daughter act, but aside from that, they all seem lost in the script. Regardless, it’s a must-see for all thriller fans!

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Theater MasksWe need you (yes, you!) to help with our annual summer theatre project.  Writing, acting, designing and decorating, putting on makeup, running sound fx and lights – whatever your talents and interests, there is a role for you!  Beginning Monday, June 16, earn volunteer hours (and have fun!) at the library.

When? 1:00-3:00 pm Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays June 16 – July 18 (with a performance on July 19).
Where? Niles Public Library, in the large meeting room
What? Create an original play for children & families
Why? It’s fun & a good deed!

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