The first season was good. The second season is almost perfect (barring the silly season ending). This show is an example of why writing is so crucial to making a good idea great. The scripts are sharp and perfectly witty. The dialogue snaps off the characters tongues as if they are those characters instead of paid actors. This is not to say the plotting is not good…it is. But the sharpness of the writing is what, I feel, really makes this show stand out from the other “controversial” shows that cable offers. The basic plotline revolves around a recent widow with two boys (one teenager and one younger) who supports her family by selling pot in an upscale suburban neighborhood. Quirky characters and interesting subplots (and of course the snappy dialogue) make this show a must see!

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The quintessential Cary Grant comedy pegs him with Myrna Loy and what a team they make. Grant plays a frustrated NYC husband who according to the opening narration by Melvin Douglas (who plays Grant’s best friend and lawyer), “makes $15,000 a year” as an advertising executive. For 1948, that puts this family in the upper-middle class range, which, I guess, is why Grant yearns for more space than he, his wife and their two daughters have in their cramped Manhattan apartment. So, he gets the idea to move. And that is where the fun begins. Not the film to see if you are moving soon or especially having a new home built, but one to watch when you need something for a few easy laughs.

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