Admittedly, I do not go to the movies as much as I used to.  It’s attributed to somewhat having no time…somewhat it’s too expensive.  But, mostly it’s that there are not any “Theater Worthy” movies out there.  If I am going to spend $12 on a ticket and then $12 on concessions (I could leave this part out but what would be the fun in that), the movie better be worth it…meaning something which I have to see NOW and not just wait for the DVD…something I MUST see on the  big screen.  Finally, that something has arrived.

I have been waiting ALL YEAR for the 23rd (official) installment of the James Bond series: Skyfall.  So much so that I had midnight tickets (a first) for an IMAX theater (first time in 10+ years).  Boy, was I excited.
And Skyfall did not disappoint.  It is not the BEST Bond movie ever (even Daniel Craig’s first Bond outing as 007 in Casino Royale was slightly better) but it was extraordinarily entertaining and exceeded my high expectations.
Craig stars as the super-spy, the consummate British agent with the License to Kill and orders from Her Majesty’s government to do anything necessary to get the job done.  As in his two previous outings as Bond (should we even count Quantum of Solace?), Craig plays the MI6 agent very close to the chest.  He’s not particularly worried about being suave, as Sean Connery was.  He’s not anywhere near droll, which Roger Moore specialized in and which Pierce Brosnan also excelled in.  He’s not sex-less like Timothy Dalton.  He’s a man’s man.  He’s tough all the time, brutal when he needs to be, heartless at times, romantic at others, and sensitive when the situation calls for it (rarely, but it does happen).  There is no facade here…Craig’s Bond seems to stick to the adage: what you see if what you get.  And, after wise-cracking Moore and Brosnan, frigid Dalton and super-smooth Connery, we need a Bond who is all of those…and much more.
So, will it be two+  more long, cold, Bond-less years until I step into a theater again…desperately waiting for the 24th installment?  I hope not.  But, it will be a tall order to top this theater experience anytime soon!

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A fast-paced, exciting show that keeps the audience on their edge of their seats; this show is about the British organization MI:5…which is the spy agency that handles all activities WITHIN Great Britain (MI:6, where James Bond works, is responsible for the activities OUTSIDE Britain). If this show is even 10% accurate on what a spy goes through and what spies have to deal with, it is frightening. Taking spying into the 21st Century, this show does a great job of utilizing all of the new technological gadgetry and true-life terror threats as background in their episodes. A great cast helps push this show over the top…it’s provocative, insightful, very topical and fascinating.

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Praised as the first true Hitchcock masterpiece, this is a great spy thriller, though I wouldn’t actually label it as one of Hitchcock’s best. What I would say is that this is probably the film that sealed Hitchcock as the main director of the thriller genre, because it is a strong thriller and also because it was a box office hit. The story follows Robert Donat’s character, who’s on the run for a crime he had nothing to do with. Enter Madeleine Carroll who at first provides an excellent foil but then also becomes a willing love interest. It’s a great movie with two wonderful performances by Donat and Carroll. In addition to being one of the first Hitchcock films to use the “wronged” man as a theme, it also is probably the first use of something later coined as the MacGuffin, a plot device that is used to move the story along but actually, it’s of no true significance to the story. Here, the MacGuffin would be the formula inside the mind of Mr. Memory. The 39 Steps is a fast-paced thriller that really keeps the audience guessing right until the very end…and one of the best of British Hitchcock.

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The second film Hitchcock made in America was really his attempt to help the WWII effort in England (it was made before America entered the war). Joel McCrea plays a naïve, inexperienced journalist who somehow gets caught in a spy ring. By far, the best part of this one is the ending, among the windmills of (what is supposed to be) Holland. Unfortunately, Hitchcock never worked McCrea again…they made a good team. McCrea seemed comfortable with the material and Hitchcock used his character well. Not one of the major Hitchcock films, but a must-see regardless.

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