14 Romance Movies Love is in the air this Valentine’s Day! For all the hopeless romantics out there, here at the Niles Library we’ve got the perfect selection of romance movies to tug at your heartstrings. So if you’ve got a special someone (or two named Ben & Jerry), grab one of these sweet flicks and fall in love with love all over again.

1) When Harry Met Sally (1989)

2) A Walk to Remember (2002)

3) The Notebook (2004)

4) The Princess Bride (1987)

5) Valentine’s Day (2010)

6) Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

7) 10 Things I Hate About You (1999)

8) Legally Blonde (2001)

9) Titanic (1997)

10) Ghost (1990)

11) West Side Story (1961)

12) Pretty Woman (1990)

13) The Fault in Our Stars (2014)

14) An Affair to Remember (1957)

As usual, you can search through our entire DVD/Blu-ray collection at www.nileslibrary.org. Or if you’re technologically inclined, you can download up to ten of these heart-warmers using Hoopla, a new service that lets you instantly download movies, music, and more onto your mobile devices 24/7. All you need is your Niles Public Library card to register at hoopladigital.com/home. Have a happy Valentine’s Day!

Valentine-Puppy-Dog
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TBR5

This movie is old by now, but it is the last significant movie that I’ve seen in a while. I’m super excited for Mockingjay, but that is besides the point.

If I Stay is a tearjerker, and you cannot label it as any less. All of my family members shed at least one tear, and that says a lot since my Polish, whiskey-drinking grandma came along to watch it with my aunt, sister, and me. If I had to put a label on it, I would say that this is a romance movie but I do not have to since this is my blog, and I am glad I do not have to because it was so much more than that.

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wedding-night

Once again, Kinsella brings her brand of fluff to fiction.

Straying once again from her mainstay Shopaholic series, this stand-alone story revolves around Lottie and Ben, a couple who reunite after years and rekindle their love affair. Soon they are getting married. Lottie’s family thinks this is a drastic mistake, so they do everything in their power to stop the quickie marriage from being consummated. Sound silly? I will not lie: It is. However, it would not be Kinsella if it was not knee-deep in silly. That is part of the appeal here; you do not read this in place of Tolstoy. You read this at a beach or on vacation when you are trying to escape from reality.

When you want something meaty and in-depth to read, please do not seek out Kinsella. If you do not want to think and you want to escape into a fun, light story, Sophie Kinsella is for you!

Wedding Night is available for check out at the Niles Public Library!

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gone-with-the-wind

One of the most beloved and acclaimed movies of the 20th Century, Gone with the Wind is the winner of eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Best Actress winner Vivien Leigh stars as Scarlett O’Hara, who is one of the most timeless characters in cinema history, not to mention one of the prettiest Southern Belles ever. From Margaret Mitchell’s iconic novel on life in the South before, after, and during the Civil War, Scarlett becomes engrained in the American consciousness as the epitome of beauty and selfishness. She spends most of her time pining over a man she can never have (Ashley Wilkes), and when she wins him over, she wants the man she has had all along (the infamous Rhett Butler). Her fickleness comes off mostly as charming – the men in her life understand that this is how she is. And every time she is let down by one of her beaus, her Mammy (Best Supporting Actress winner Hattie McDaniel) is right there to help Scarlett survive. After all, tomorrow is another day!

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maxmary

I’m not that fascinated by contemporary animated films. I love what Aardman Animation does (Wallace and Gromit, Shaun the Sheep), but aside from that, most animation of today leaves me yearning for the non-computerized animation of the past…where tedious work was done all by hand to bring to life a spectacular finished product. This is why when a colleague recommended an animated film for adults and older kids entitled Mary and Max, I was highly skeptical. And, boy was I surprised at what awaited me.

Mary and Max is done in the “Claymation” style of animation, meaning CLAY animation. Claymation has advanced since the days of watching Davey and Goliath in grammar school (if you are not familiar with D&G’s stop-motion style of Claymation, don’t worry – it was not worth remembering). This movie’s animation, in addition to the sweet, touching story, is most definitely worth remembering, and even savoring. Mary and Max are both endearing characters that will stay with you for a long time. I do tend to gravitate towards holding “sad sack” characters in higher esteem…Eeyore was always my favorite Pooh character, as well as the Looney Tunes’ Elmer Fudd, and the ever-pathetic Dopey, the silent dwarf. Mary and Max both fall into that category…each being sad, lonely and lost in their own unhappy worlds.

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her-dvd

Set in the near future (specific year unnamed), Theodore is a sad sack. His marriage just broke up, he does not want to go out or do things, like hang out with friends, and his day job is writing personal letters (love letters, thank you letters, etc.) for other people who are just as pathetic as he is. So, what does he do to try to change things up some in his life: he buys a new computer with a personal, talking, interactive, emotive operating system (OS). And this OS changes his life.

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obit-writer

A riveting and ominous tale of loss, love and heartbreak set in both 1919 and the early 1960s. The 1919 story involves a past love who most likely perished in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and a woman, Vivian, who cannot get over her loss. Vivian is “the kept woman” to David, a married man who might or might not leave his wife for her. The earthquake ends whatever future they might have, but Vivian is determined to find him and she is still hoping for a passionate, heartfelt reunion all the way until 1919, when she finds out the truth.

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BEFORE-MIDNIGHT-stills

The third and last (?) in the Richard Linklater directed and Julie Delpy/Ethan Hawke starring series, Before Midnight again features more dialogue and banter between characters than plot. But, after three movies, we are used to that and we know these characters so well, we pretty much know what they are going to say and do. Not that this is a good or bad thing…but it’s comfortable. Like an old pair of slippers, these films have charmed us, endeared us, and romanced us. A little refresher on the series: Before Sunrise (1995) is set in Vienna and has Jesse (Hawke) and Celine (Delpy) meeting on a train and taking a risk by spending the whole day with each other. They talked and walked and laughed and talked and walked and laughed some more. As they fell in love, so did we with them.

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age of desire

First of all, I need to say that I am an Edith Wharton fan. She is probably my favorite author ever. So, stating that, I really, really loved this book, which is historical fiction about her life…and somewhat about her work.

The novel is told from the point of view of both Wharton herself and Wharton’s assistant/secretary/confidant Anna, who was more like a mother to Edith than Edith’s own mother ever was. Aside from being a friend and constant companion, Anna helped Edith with her writing…by typing her pages but also by offering her tips on story structure and character development.

Though Anna is technically a servant, Edith and Anna are quite close…but when Edith begins to stray away from her marriage into the arms of another man (who Anna believes is a cad and a gold-digger), Edith begins to question Anna’s loyalty.

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 In 1981 Nora Roberts published her first novel, Irish Thoroughbred. Some thirty years later Roberts has written her 200th published novel, Witness and it is a ROMANCE WINNER!  Elizabeth Fitch is a sixteen year old daughter of a frigid surgeon mother in Chicago, who fed up with the rigid life style her mother commands, goes to the mall, buys clothes not dictated by her mother and goes to a club with a school acquaintance. She drinks too much, winds up at the home of a member of the Russian mob and witnesses several murders. She runs for her life and calls 911. Ultimately she is in a safe house under the protection of several agents but on her birthday her good guy protectors are killed by fellow agents in league with the mob. Elizabeth escapes and knows she can trust no one.
Fast forward twelve years Elizabeth Fitch is now Abigail Lowery, a computer genius running a profitable security company, hiding out in Bickford Arkansas with her gun collection and well trained dog. The new handsome chief of police, Brooks Gleason is curious and is not shy about trying to unlock the puzzle of Abigail Lowery.
 I stayed way past my bedtime finishing this novel. It is a strong romantic suspense read with good characterization and pacing.   Her computer hacking skills, sharp intelligence and vulnerability make Abigail an interesting study.  Brooks Gleason is kind, handsome, smart and of course the perfect male. Roberts is deft with dialogue and the humor is well spaced with the suspense.  On a cold winter night, Witness provided cozy relaxing comfort.
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