Tomboy-Review

As a young girl growing up in the 1980s-90s, cartoonist Liz Prince preferred wearing sneakers, a boys’ blazer and a baseball cap instead of wearing dresses. She role-played Ghostbusters with her guy friend Tyler, and played right field on her local little league team. This preference for “non-girly” things continued through her adolescence and is the subject of Tomboy, her new memoir for teens.

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five-memorial

I should start this review by expressing some bias on my part. I am personally connected to the events in this book since my uncle was one of the patients in Memorial during Katrina. Thankfully, he was one of the lucky ones who got out shortly after the flooding began. As I was reading this story, it was all the more captivating and heart-wrenching since I kept thinking what would have happened had my uncle not been as lucky.

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dad-books

Father’s Day is only a couple of days away.

Whether you’re a son or daughter wanting to buy your father a gift or you’re a father looking for a good read this weekend, we have a great list for you!

This list has a little bit of everything. Celebs writing about fatherhood. Check! A Guy Fieri cookbook. Check! How to become the coolest dad around. Check!

All the titles are linked back to our catalog for more information, availability, or to place a hold. Happy Father’s Day!

A Father First: How My Life Became Bigger Than Basketball by Dwyane Wade

Be Prepared: A Practical Handbook for New Dads by Gary Greenberg

Be the Coolest Dad on the Block: All of the Tricks, Games, Puzzles, and Jokes You Need to Impress your Kids (and Keep Them Entertained for Years to Come!) by Steve Caplin

Big Daddy’s Rules: Raising Daughters Is Tougher Than I Look by Steven R. Schirripa

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TourofBooks

It seems almost everyone is compelled to close out the year with a list of Bests. Librarians are no exception, but this year we’re asking you to help us out.

What was the best book of 2013? We narrowed the field to 12 and fashioned the list into a bonafide Tournament of Books, starting on March 1.

The brackets will be posted on the Third Floor slatwall. Every week, paired books will go head to head. Our judges will select a winner to advance to the next round. Tournament books are available in multiple formats for your convenience.

Join in the fun by reading and voting for the best book. Ballots will also be on the Third Floor slatwall.

Here’s a list of this year’s Tournament of Book contenders vying to the title of 2013:

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The cover image for this 2009 boo was shot by Jaems Karales during the 1963 march from Selma to Montgomery.

During the past few years we’ve seen a boom in books on the Civil Rights Movement.

Here are just a few of our recent favorites (plus one DVD). Click on the link to place a hold on the title.

Controversy and Hope: The Civil Rights Photographs of James Karales (2013)
by James Karales

Photojournalist James Karales (1930–2002) documented the 54-mile Selma to Montgomery March for Voting Rights in 1965. This beautiful new book presents many of his images from the era, including some published for the first time ever.

Controversy and Hope can be found with our New Nonfiction Materials in the Commons area on the Main Floor of the Library.

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YALSA, the Young Adult Library Services Association, has announced the winners of several annual book awards this week.

The Printz Award honors a book that a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature. This year’s winner is Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi.  This adventure is set in a not-too-distant future that has been ravaged by global warming. Nailer makes a living by scavenging shipwrecks for copper wire and dreams of making a lucky strike that will allow him to escape his dangerous dad. He longs to parasail aboard one of the sleek schooners that he sees far out on the open ocean. One night a nasty storm grinds all work on the beach to a halt. Nailer and his friend Pima discover a wrecked schooner and go scavenging, only to find a girl on board who wears more wealth on her fingers than they have ever dreamed of. Do they kill her and take her rings? Or do they risk their lives to return her to her clan?

The YALSA Nonfiction Award honors the best nonfiction book published for young adults each year.  This year’s winner is Janis Joplin: Rise up Singing by Ann Angel. This book was a labor of love. Angel worked on it for years, conducting interviews with Joplin’s friends.  The eye-popping design is a delight. The colors and patterns adorning the pages reflect the psychedelic look of Joplin’s album art. There are also many photos of Joplin, some filling an entire page, that show her both in her awkward youth and as the performer that she transformed herself into. This a fun book to browse through. Angel does a really good job of describing Joplin’s persona and the impact she had on people.

The Morris Award honors a debut-novel written for teens.  This year’s winner is The Freak Observer by Blythe Woolston.  Suffering from a crippling case of post-traumatic stress disorder, sixteen-year-old Loa Lindgren tries to use her problem solving skills, sharpened in physics and computer programming, to cure herself. “With insightful humor and an impressive economy of language, Woolston brings a fresh voice to teen fiction that will challenge and delight readers,” said Morris Award Chair Summer Hayes.

In addition to these awards, YALSA has produced  Best Fiction, Great Graphic Novels, Quick Picks, Adult Books, and Popular Paperback lists. There’s lots of great books here, so check them out!

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YALSA has just announced the five finalists for their brand new award for young adult nonfiction.  Here they are.

Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream
by Tanya Lee Stone

“Angering and inspiring. 13 women proved in the early 1960s that they were just as suited to space exploration as men  and yet they were denied the opportunity.  These “almost astronauts” share details about the early days of the space program that you won’t find anywhere else.”

Charles and Emma: The Darwins’ Leap of Faith
by Deborah Heiligman

“Opposites attract! Charles Darwin is a budding naturalist, struggles with religious doubt, and is fresh from a voyage around the world. Emma Wedgwood loves music, is devoutly Christian, and a sloppy homebody. When they decide to marry, both are terrified. Their beliefs seem very different, but both are open-minded.”

Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice
by Phillip Hoose

“Claudette Colvin was just 15 years old when she refused to give up her bus seat for a white person. “It’s my constitutional right!” she declared, as Montgomery, Alabama police officers pulled her off the bus.  She later provided key testimony in a landmark court case against segregation.”

The Great and Only Barnum: The Tremendous and Stupendous Life of Showman P. T. Barnum
by Candace Fleming

Written in Bone: Buried Lives of Jamestown and Colonial Maryland
by Sally M. Walker

“Fascinating true forensic & historical mystery. Forensic anthropologists study the skeletons of people of different ages and walks of life who lived and died along Chesapeake Bay. Enlightening & never dull!”

All five titles are available at the Niles Public Library.

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