One of the best endings in film…not the best movie, per se…or even the best thriller. But, the ending makes the movie payoff. You really do not see it coming…at least I didn’t. Doris Day shines as the tortured wife of an overly hardworking businessman. She begins hearing voices and then starts getting crank calls. Is she making this up to get more attention from her husband? Is she really in danger? And if so, by whom? Being a huge Hitchcock fan, I?m always skeptical of thrillers that try to copy the image and style of the Master of Suspense. Thankfully, I feel this one is not something Alfred Hitchcock would have disappointed with.

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The post Pillow Talk 1960s romantic comedies could be summed up in two words: Doris Day. The country was heading into a total transformation but good old Doris was trying her best to keep the American public firmly planted in the 1940s and 1950s, which is when romantic comedies like this shined and didn’t seem as tarnished. Don’t get me wrong…I love Doris Day. I can belt out “Que Sera Sera” in the shower with the best of ‘um (you’re going to have to take my word for it). But, by the mid-1960s, her clean image as the “good” girl was wearing a little thin. This film (one of her two pairings with co-star James Garner) is no exception. Garner (as Day’s husband) seems like a caveman in this film, always barking that his wife is not home since she’s out working! The horror!!!! But, all kidding aside, this would have to be one of my most guilty pleasures. I used to say that about Pillow Talk, but at least that film won an Oscar! This one didn’t come close but it’s just as much fun and just as sweet. The plot is silly and the dialogue is very outdated by today’s standards (or even by the mid-1960s standards) but it’s just a fun film to watch. Any film that has a pool explode into a yard-full of suds can’t be half bad, right?

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The magical combination of Cary Grant and Doris Day adds to this charming and quirky script about an unemployed woman (Day) whose life is never the same again after Grant’s limo accidentally splashes water on her, as she was waiting to cross the street. Gig Young co-stars as Grant’s assistant and his role adds the majority of laughs to the movie, whereas Grant and Day add the romance. This film sealed Day’s fate as the “perpetual virgin” of the 1960s, as she is afraid to even be in the same room alone with handsome Grant. She even breaks out in a rash when she believes he might try something!

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A hypochondriac misunderstands his doctor and believes he only has days to live. So, he tries to set his wife up with a potential new husband, but along the way she believes he’s having an affair. I know what you’re thinking….another cutesy comedy from Doris Day and Rock Hudson. And, if you’re thinking that, you would be right. But, because Day and Hudson only made three movies together (also Pillow Talk and Lover Come Back), we should savor all of them, especially Send Me No Flowers since it is their last movie together. Unlike their other two screen pairings, here Day and Hudson play a married couple at the beginning of this film, so the love story ending where they come together in mad passion is not there, right? Well, I’ll keep you guessing.

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Doris Day and Rock Hudson’s first teaming together…for this zany comedy which puts Day as a single interior designer who shares a party-line with a womanizing songwriter (Hudson). Through a mutual friend, Hudson finds out Day is attractive but she has already made her dislike for him known. When he meets her, he disguises his voice and makes up a name and identity to help lead her on. This film won an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay and it is truly deserved—a little dated by today’s romantic comedy standards but still a great funny movie with snappy, classy dialogue.

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Doris Day teams with Clark Gable in this witty and intelligent comedy with Gable as a hard-nosed newspaper editor who does not believe in education, but rather experience. Day is the journalism professor who will teach him that both schooling and experience are invaluable. While they learn together, they fall in love. Day seems to be having more fun in this film than any film of her career—she simply shines in this role. Gable fits the bill as the perfect tough, ruthless editor who has no room for love in his heart. Their performances, along with the always-entertaining Gig Young, make this ordinary film extraordinary.

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This film is one of director Alfred Hitchcock’s more underrated films, especially since its only notoriety comes from introducing the song Que Sera Sera to the general public. Even though the famed director often copied styles and plot lines from some of his previous movies, The Man Who Knew Too Much stands alone as being the only true remake Hitchcock ever filmed—it is an updated version of Hitchcock’s own 1934 thriller of the same title. Taking the story of the 1934 film and enhancing it with location and character changes, the 1956 film is a terrific example of how a good film can become a great film. The movie stars Doris Day and James Stewart as an American couple visiting the French Morocco with their young son. After befriending a British couple, they soon find themselves embroiled in a series of terrifying events, including the kidnapping of their son. In addition to Hitchcock’s filmmaking, both Day and Stewart (appearing in his third of four collaborations with Hitchcock) make this film much more than just a standard thriller. The scene in the Royal Albert Hall in London stands out as one of the most intense, nail-biting scenes of pure suspense ever filmed. There is no dialogue and the scene lasts several minutes, but the anxiety of Day’s performance along with the climatic direction by Hitchcock keeps the viewer glued to the screen.

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