Lord Crick has died. While convulsing. And turning yellow. And providing his family with a gruesome corpse. Although young Lord Crick had some health issues (i.e. the pox) and a rather nasty disposition, it really was a ghastly and horrific death. His sister Lady Lydia decides that there must be a further investigation. The gossip against her husband Captain Flynn, who is her brother’s heir, is becoming scandalous. On the advice of her cousin Francis, she travels to London to meet with Dr. Thomas Silkstone, an American physician who is working, studying and teaching with British anatomist Dr. Carruthers. Silkstone, who is quite taken with Lady Lydia, agrees reluctantly to exhume and examine the corpse and answer questions at the inquest.

When he is at the estate, he finds not just a house in mourning, but a household full of secrets. Silkstone uses his primitive forensic and toxicology skills to study the remains, but he finds more questions than answers, and his list of suspects in the household grows.  The tension swells, and the plot twists,  but will Silkstone (with some help from Carruthers,) find the answers with his scientific methods before there is another body found on the estate? Harris writes a layered tale of forensic mystery using engaging characters who struggle with the conventions of their time. Silkstone is wonderful as the outsider looking into their society. Can’t wait to read the next one in the series!

The Anatomist’s Apprentice by Tessa Harris 

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By far my favorite book of 2012 (even though I read it in 2013).  It is a strong, fierce thriller that combines social commentary and suspense…all in one well-written story.  It is no surprise to me that Ruth Rendell is still writing strong, highly literary pieces of fiction.  She is one of the leaders of the mystery genre, especially British mysteries.  Writing here as Barbara Vine, Rendell writes what I think is one of her best in years…lending truth to the adage that some things improves with age. 

The story here starts off in 2011 with a sister and her brother, Grace and Andrew, sharing a home in London.  They divide the living space of the house equally, a situation which works fine until the brother’s lover, James, comes to live with them.  James sets off a series of events that neither Grace nor Andrew will ever recover from.  While coping, Grace begins reading a long-lost manuscript, never published because its storyline includes unwed mothers and homosexual characters in the 1920s.  That’s when a completely different part of the story takes over.  Or at least we THINK it’s different…because it is set in the post-WWI era.  Soon, correlations between Grace’s modern-day dilemmas and the historical plot become evident. 

The historical storyline revolves around a sister, Maud, the youngest child in a very conservative Bristol family, who gets herself pregnant. After telling her family, they want to send her away.  But, her brother John has a different idea.  He is homosexual and aware that he will never be able to lead a respectable life as a gay man, so he and Maud begin living together as husband and wife…in name only…so that the child does not seem illegitimate. 

Both storylines are interesting and compelling but the historical one just captivates the reader with twists and turns that the reader never expects (or at least I didn’t).  I found both tales together a great commentary on how things regarding sexuality and homosexuality have changed…yet how some things have stayed the same through the centuries. 

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The time has come!  The time I have been waiting for decades for!  The time I might have been waiting for from the day I was born!  It is here!  Alfred Hitchcock has come back into the realm of popular culture with a vengeance!!!!
My family got their first VCR for the Bears’ January 1986 Super Bowl.  Shortly thereafter, I discovered Hitchcock.  Having died in 1980, six years prior to my discovery of him, Hitchcock was no longer “in the news,” so to speak.  I watched most of his movies and tried my best to find out everything I could about him, but most of the stuff I found was from ages ago.  Yes, the occasional article would be written, but for the most part, Hitchcock was history!
History NO longer!  There are 3…count them 3…new movies or television shows dedicated to the life and/or work of the Master of Suspense:  Hitchcock, the feature film starring Anthony Hopkins as the director and Helen Mirren as his devoted wife, Alma; The Girl, an HBO movie starring Toby Jones as Hitchcock, about the making of The Birds; and Bates Motel, an A&E TV show starring Vera Farmiga as Mrs. Bates and Freddie Highmore as young Norman, about the early life of the Psycho family.
In addition to that (as if that wasn’t enough!), many of Hitchcock’s films are coming out on Blu-Ray and getting a lot of press, not to mention the British Film Institute and their months-long celebration of all things Hitchcock, to cap off their year-long “Rescue the Hitchcock 9” fundraiser to help restore nine of Hitchcock’s early British silent works.  The event, appropriately titled The Genius of Hitchcock, was a full retrospective of his works plus guests and lectures speaking about all facets of Hitchcock. 
So, basically, I’m on cloud nine.  Finally, FINALLY, the masses are catching on to the brilliance and talent of Hitchcock.  It’s about time!

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Recently, I flew to London to attend several days of the two-month-long The Genius of Hitchcock festival held at the British Film Institute’s Southbank campus.
Starting in June and ending after London’s yearly October film festival, the BFI pulled out all of the stops to honor one of their own…a British director who became an international sensation by helming such movies as Rear WindowVertigoNotorious and Psycho

The Genius of Hitchcock celebration caps off the year-long fund-raising push entitled Rescue the Hitchcock 9, a campaign to save nine of Hitchcock’s early British silent films.  These nine films are in dire need of restoration…without it, there is the chance they might be gone forever.
Being a BIT of a Hitchcock fan (OK…a little understatement —I’m obsessed), I would have loved to hunker down in London all four months, savoring classic after classic.  But, there is this little thing called WORK, not to mention MONEY, of which staying in London requires a lot.  So, alas, I settled on cramming in as many movies as I could in my limited time (five films, to be exact).
Have I seen all five before?  You betcha.  Do I own all five on DVD?  Yes, I do.  But, somehow, traveling over 3,700 miles to see movies I know by heart doesn’t seem all that silly to me.   Obsessed, I tell you!
Like I said, I saw five of Hitchcock’s masterpieces (sadly none of the restored “Hitchcock 9” were playing when I was there).  I watched a double feature of Shadow of a Doubt and The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) on one night, followed by a double feature of Mr. and Mrs. Smith (no, not THAT one…the 1941 film with Robert Montgomery and Carole Lombard…the only romantic comedy Hitchcock ever made) and Strangers on a Train on the next.

But, the crème de la crème, the pièce de résistance was the 3D showing of Dial M for Murder.  No, this is NOT NEW 3D…this is old, classic 3D.  This is when 3D was done for effect and not financial gain.  This is when 3D was not a marketing ploy.
I have a strong distain for the new wave of 3D films sweeping through Hollywood, though I am much more against 2D films being re-released in 3D, such as Titanic (1997) and Beauty and the Beast (1991).  When I saw Scorsese’s Hugo (which I heard nothing but great things about in 3D), I specifically sought out the 2D version.
Maybe I’m equating my lack of interest in modern 3D with my lack of interest in most contemporary animation.  Look at Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs —imagine how tedious and superior the animation process was back in 1937 and compare that with today’s inferior “computer” animating.  So OK, modern 3D is not that bad…but, RE-RELEASING already-shot films just to capitalize on the 3D bandwagon is the last straw.  Where will it end?
Dial M for Murder is different.  Hitchcock filmed it in 3D but it was released in 1954 in mostly 2D.  Aside from a limited 3D re-release in the early 1980s, most people have not seen Dial M for Murder in the original 3D Hitchcock intended it to be shown.  And, among filmies, it is supposed to be one of the best, if not THE best, example of 3D filmmaking.  And, after seeing it, not only does it not disappoint but I would have to agree that the use of 3D was amazing.
Unlike much of 1950s’ Hollywood 3D, nothing here is done just for the 3D effect (such as no paddleballs bouncing at the screen, a la The House of Wax (1953)).  Everything here is done for a reason…the use of foregrounds and backgrounds become more of a 3D element than in-your-face effects.  In one scene, the infamous purse that becomes a key item in the plot stands boldly in the foreground, with character action going on behind it.  The purse, a simple inanimate object, looks as if it is right in the audience’s lap.  And that is how Hitchcock uses 3D throughout the entire movie…subtly but OH SO effectively.  But then again, would we expect anything less from the Master himself?
Keep in mind that as long as Hollywood keeps making money off of 3D, they will keep making these so-so 3D movies and…even worse, keep re-releasing existing 2D movies in 3D.  If The Bridge on the River Kwai in 3D comes out in cinemas, I’m moving to Mongolia and living in among the yak herders in a nice yurt!
Madness, Madness.  Soapbox over.

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I recently re-read The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society,  a book I liked.  Upon second reading, I re-liked it all over again…but even more.  I LOVED it on the second read.
Why?  Well, could it be attributed to growing older (I first read it in 2009)? Or experiencing more loss and pain in life?  Or maybe just being in the mood for a sentimental book?
Well, whatever it was that made me change my GOOD read to a GREAT read, I thoroughly enjoyed every page of this story.  There is something for everyone here…romance, history, sentimentality, friendship, etc.
One of the things I forgot was how immersed you get into the world of Guernsey and the period of the story (post-WWII).  I remember adding Guernsey to my “must see” travel list right after I finished this book the first time.  Well, this time, I wanted to RUN there.  Between the sense of place and the sense of history, I felt like I was right there, in 1940s Guernsey, chatting with the characters and partaking of some potato peel pie.  The characters all jump off the page so it is easy to imagine them conversing with me about books and travel and the hardships of the war.
Told exclusively through letters exchanged from Guernsey natives to Juliet, a writer who is searching for her next story, this book begins in 1946, after the Germans left Guernsey.  Juliet lives in London and somehow, one of Guernsey’s residents comes across a book that has Juliet’s name in it so he writes to her.  This letter strikes up a series of events that leads to Juliet and some of her friends traveling to Guernsey and becoming one of the Guernsey family.
No, it is not one of the finest books ever written.  But, sometimes you just need a book to transport you to another world for a little while…something that takes your mind away from the ordinary and the mundane.  For me, this was that book.  Maybe it will be yours too.

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Admittedly, I do not go to the movies as much as I used to.  It’s attributed to somewhat having no time…somewhat it’s too expensive.  But, mostly it’s that there are not any “Theater Worthy” movies out there.  If I am going to spend $12 on a ticket and then $12 on concessions (I could leave this part out but what would be the fun in that), the movie better be worth it…meaning something which I have to see NOW and not just wait for the DVD…something I MUST see on the  big screen.  Finally, that something has arrived.

I have been waiting ALL YEAR for the 23rd (official) installment of the James Bond series: Skyfall.  So much so that I had midnight tickets (a first) for an IMAX theater (first time in 10+ years).  Boy, was I excited.
And Skyfall did not disappoint.  It is not the BEST Bond movie ever (even Daniel Craig’s first Bond outing as 007 in Casino Royale was slightly better) but it was extraordinarily entertaining and exceeded my high expectations.
Craig stars as the super-spy, the consummate British agent with the License to Kill and orders from Her Majesty’s government to do anything necessary to get the job done.  As in his two previous outings as Bond (should we even count Quantum of Solace?), Craig plays the MI6 agent very close to the chest.  He’s not particularly worried about being suave, as Sean Connery was.  He’s not anywhere near droll, which Roger Moore specialized in and which Pierce Brosnan also excelled in.  He’s not sex-less like Timothy Dalton.  He’s a man’s man.  He’s tough all the time, brutal when he needs to be, heartless at times, romantic at others, and sensitive when the situation calls for it (rarely, but it does happen).  There is no facade here…Craig’s Bond seems to stick to the adage: what you see if what you get.  And, after wise-cracking Moore and Brosnan, frigid Dalton and super-smooth Connery, we need a Bond who is all of those…and much more.
So, will it be two+  more long, cold, Bond-less years until I step into a theater again…desperately waiting for the 24th installment?  I hope not.  But, it will be a tall order to top this theater experience anytime soon!

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Even though I am a sucker for British TV series, I had somehow skipped this one because I thought it would be too much like CSI for me. But, it most definitely is not…it’s a must see for anyone who likes crime shows. If anything, it’s unlike most crime shows because it focuses on cold cases…cases no one cares about anymore. And, yes, there is a certain CSI and Bones aspect to it…since one of the team members is an forensic pathologist. But, the show is much more than that. It’s about a people and the relationships between all of the team. They have to battle themselves and the past when looking into these past cases. All in all, a great, fascinating show that will keep you glued to your TV.

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This year, eyes and TV sets around the world will be focused on London, the capital of what is really a small island between the North Atlantic and the North Sea, also known as the United Kingdom.  London is in England, one of four countries that make up the UK…the others being Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland.     What is it about London that makes it such a fascinating city?

Well, for one, unlike many European cities, London is seriously multicultural.  VERY multicultural.  And I’m not talking tourists.  I’m talking residents.  All races, religions, socioeconomic levels are on view throughout most parts of London.  Yes, in some of the swankier sections (Knightsbridge, Mayfair to name two), most of the people have more than their fair share of  Pound Sterling in their pockets.  But, London is a mammoth, vast city with section upon section of diverse areas.  Take Kensington…which borders ritzy area Knightsbridge and is not far from the also ritzy Chelsea.  Kensington has more Indian restaurants than British restaurants it seems.  The Indian dish Chicken tikka masala, not fish and chips, is even London’s honorary national meal. When we think British, we think Protestant and white.  In the countryside, maybe…but not in London.

Let’s move on to London’s fascinating history.  Unlike our cities in this country, London has recorded history dating back thousands of years.  Yes…thousands.  From the Romans who founded the city as Londinium to the Anglo-Saxons to the Tudors, every corner of London bears some history worth repeating.  The formally-walled “City of London” is the present-day financial center of the capital and is one of the 32 boroughs of London.  There are still places within The City, or Square Mile, as it is sometimes called, where you can see some of the London Wall, first built around The City by the Romans.  Just to the east of The City lies Whitechapel, the former stomping grounds of that vicious deviant Jack the Ripper, who killed at least five prostitutes in the late 1880s.  And on the other side of the River Thames (which throughout much of history, was wider than the present-day river running through London today), there is the George Inn in Southwark…a pub that can date it’s history back to the 17th Century.  Yes, that’s right…the 1600s.  No, the George we see today is not the exact same one from the 1600s, but there has been a pub on that site for almost 400 years!  That’s a lot of pints!

Lastly, let’s look at London’s cultural side.  Most major cities can boast opera houses and a smattering of theaters and maybe one or two concert venues.  But, London is the HOME of the stage production…with its West End surpassing our Broadway in both longevity, history and profitability.  Many famed Broadway productions began as West End productions…and many acclaimed actors and actresses got their start on the London stage.

As the Summer Olympics approach (the opening ceremonies are on July 27), we thought everyone might want to get into a LONDON frame of mind to prepare.  Here are some books and authors that might fit the bill:

Books set in London
40 Love by Madeleine Wickham
Abbot Agency series by Veronica Heley
Abdication by Juliet Nicolson
About A Boy by Nick Hornby
After You by Julie Buxbaum
Airs and Graces by Roz Southey
Alan Grant series by Josephine Tey
Amsterdam by Ian Mcewan
The Anatomist’s Apprentice by Tessa Harris
Anatomy of Murder by Imogen Robertson
Anna Travis series & Jane Tennison/Prime Suspect series by Lynda La Plante
Anthem for Doomed Youth by Carola Dunn
Arthur and George by Julian Barnes
The Best of Friends by Joanna Trollope
The Best of Times by Penny Vincenzi
Bill Slider series by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles
Charlotte & Thomas Pitt series & William Monk series by Anne Perry
Detective Stella Mooney series by David Lawrence
Blue Monday by Nicci French
Brock & Kolla series by Barry Maitland
The Brothers of Baker Street by Michael Robertson
Bryant & May Peculiar Crimes Unit series by Christopher Fowler
Chelsea Mansions by Barry Matland
The Chemistry of Tears by Peter Carey
Dead Beat by Patricia Hall
Dead Scared by S. J. Bolton
The Dog Who Came In From the Cold by Alexander McCall Smith
Eleven by Mark Watson
The English Monster, Or, the Melancholy Transactions of William Ablass by Lloyd Shepherd
The Finishing Touches by Hester Browne
Forget Me Not by Sue Margolis
Fraud by Anita Brookner
Free To Trade by Michael Ridpath
Get Maitland by James Patrick Hunt
Gold by Chris Cleave
The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing
Get Me Out Of Here by Henry Sutton
The Good the Bad and the Uncanny By Simon Green
Hannah Wolfe series by Sarah Dunant
Hawkwood by James Mcgee
Helen West series by Frances Fyfield
Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffengger
The High Flyer by Susan Howatch
The Honey Trap by Clive Edgerton
The House of Eliott by Jean Marsh
How It All Began by Penelope Lively
I Don’t Know How She Does It by Allison Pearson
In Office Hours by Lucy Kellaway
In The Kitchen by Monica Ali
India Black by Carol K. Carr
Inglorious by Joanna Kavenna
The Innocents by Francesca Segal
The Invasion Year by Dewey Lambdin
Invisible River by Helena Mcewen
Jack Caffery series by Mo Hayder
John Coffin series by Gwendoline Butler
John McLeish & Francesca Wilson series by Janet Neel
Johnny “One Eye” Hawke series by David Stuart Davies
London Calling by James Craig
London Fields by Martin Amis
Jamrach’s Menagerie by Carol Birch
The List by Martin Fletcher
London Holiday by Richard Peck
Maisie Dobbs series by Jacqueline Winspear
Man of the Month Club by Jackie Clune
Mark Tartaglia series by Elena Forbes
A Married Man by Catherine Alcott
The Minority Council by Kate Griffin
Mr. Churchill’s Secretary by Susan Elia Macneal
The Mysterium by P. C. Doherty
Nigel Barnes series by Dan Waddell
No Mark Upon Her by Deborah Crombie
Notting Hell by Rachel Johnson
The Other Side of The Story by Marian Keyes
Park Lane by Frances Osborne
A Parliament of Spies by Cassandra Clark
Past Imperfect by Julian Fellowes
Peter Fletcher series by Simon Shaw
The Piccadilly Plot by Susanna Gregory
The Poison Tree by Erin Kelly
Rag and Bone by James R. Benn
The Reckoning by Jane Casey
Remember Me by Sophie Kinsella
Rescuing Rose by Isabel Wolff
Roommate Wanted by Lisa Jewell
Royal Spyness series by Rhys Bowen
Rumpole series by John Mortimer
Sacrilege by S.J. Parris
Sam Jones series by Lauren Henderson
Second Chance by Jane Green
The Seven Sisters by Margaret Drabble
Shopaholic Series by Sophie Kinsella
The Silent Oligarch by Chris Morgan Jones
A Small Fortune by Rosie Dastgir
The Solitary House by Lynn Shepherd
A Special Relationship by Douglas Kennedy
The Spoiler by Annalena Mcafee
Strangers by Anita Brookner
Suzie Mountford series by John Gardner
A Tale of Two Cities by Ralph Mowat
The Third Angel by Alice Hoffman
Thomas Chaloner series by Susanna Gregory
Tides of War by Stella Tillyard
Tom Thorne series by Mark Billingham
The Tower, the Zoo, and the Tortoise by Julia Stuart
Trish Maguire series by Natasha Cooper
The Twelfth Enchantment by David Liss
Waiting For Sunrise by William Boyd
When Maidens Mourn by C.S. Harris
Wintering: A Novel of Sylvia Plath by Kate Moses
The Yard by Alex Grecian
Yoga Teacher by Alexandra Gray
Zero History by William Gibson
British Mystery Authors
Agatha Christie
Ann Granger: Mitchell and Markby series
Anthea Fraser
Antonia Fraser
Arthur Conan Doyle 
Audrey Peterson
Barbara Vine
Bruce Alexander
C.S. Harris
Candace Robb
Carola Dunn: Cornish Mystery series
Cassandra Chan
Cassandra Clark
Charles Finch
Charles Todd
Chris Morgan Jones
Colin Dexter: Inspector Morse series
David Liss
Deanna Raybourn
Deborah Crombie
Deborah Grabien
Denise Mina
Diana Killian
Dick Francis
Dorothy Cannell: Ellie Haskell series
Dorothy L. Sayers
Elisabeth Bastion
Elizabeth George
Elizabeth Peters
Ellis Peters
Fiona Mountain
Gayle Lynds
Gillian Linscott
Graham Moore
H.R.F. Keating
Iain Pears
Ian Rankin (Scottish)
J.M. Gregson: Lambert and Hook series
James Craig
Jane Casey
Jeffrey Archer
Jeri Westerson
Jill McGown
Jill Paton Walsh
Joanna Challis
John Harvey
John Lawton
John Sherwood
John William Wainwright:
Judith Cook: John Latymer series
Kate Atkinson
Kate Charles
Kate Ross
Kenneth Cameron
Laura Joh Rowland
Laurie R. King
Madeleine Robins
Margaret Fraser
Margaret Yorke
Marian Babson
Marianne Macdonald
Marjorie Allingham
Marjorie Eccles
Martha Grimes
Martin Edwards: Hannah Scarlet & Daniel Kind Lake District Mysteries
Martina Cole
Mary Stewart
MC Beaton: Agatha Raisin series
Michael Robertson
Michael Robotham
Minette Walters
Nancy Atherton
Ngaio Marsh
Nicci French
Nicola Upson
P.C. Doherty
P.D. James
Patricia Hall: Michael Thackeray & Laura Ackroyd series
Peter James
Peter Lovesey
Peter Robinson: Alan Banks series
Peter Turnbull: Hennessey and Yellich series
Rebecca Kent
Reggie Nadelson
Reginald Hill
Reginald Hill: Dalziel and Pascoe series
Robert Barnard: Charlie Peace series
Robert Goddard
Robert Harris
Robert Lee Hall
Roberta Gellis
Rosamund Lupton
Rosemary Stevens
Ruth Rendell: Inspector Wexford series
S.J. Bolton
S.J. Parris
Sally Spencer: Monika Paniatowski series
Santa Montefiore
Sheri Cobb South
Simon Brett: Fethering series
Sophie Hannah
Stella Whitelaw: Jordan Lacey series
Stuart Pawson
Thomas Harris
Val McDermid
Veronica Black: Sister Joan series
Will Thomas
General Fiction Authors
Anita Brookner
Barbara Pym
Carla Neggers
Eloise James
Ian McEwan
Isabel Wolff
Jane Green
Jasper Fforde
Jeffrey Archer
Joanna Trollope
Julia Quinn
Julian Barnes
Madeleine Wickham
Marcia Willet
Margaret Drabble
Marian Keyes
Mark Haddon
Martin Amis
Mary Balogh
Mary Sheepshanks
Nicci French
Nick Hornby
Penelope Lively
Peter Carey
Salmon Rushdie
Sophie Kinsella
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This year, eyes and TV sets around the world will be focused on London, the capital of what is really a small island between the North Atlantic and the North Sea, also known as the United Kingdom.  London is in England, one of four countries that make up the UK…the others being Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland.     What is it about London that makes it such a fascinating city?

Well, for one, unlike many European cities, London is seriously multicultural.  VERY multicultural.  And I’m not talking tourists.  I’m talking residents.  All races, religions, socioeconomic levels are on view throughout most parts of London.  Yes, in some of the swankier sections (Knightsbridge, Mayfair to name two), most of the people have more than their fair share of  Pound Sterling in their pockets.  But, London is a mammoth, vast city with section upon section of diverse areas.  Take Kensington…which borders ritzy area Knightsbridge and is not far from the also ritzy Chelsea.  Kensington has more Indian restaurants than British restaurants it seems.  The Indian dish Chicken tikka masala, not fish and chips, is even London’s honorary national meal. When we think British, we think Protestant and white.  In the countryside, maybe…but not in London.

Let’s move on to London’s fascinating history.  Unlike our cities in this country, London has recorded history dating back thousands of years.  Yes…thousands.  From the Romans who founded the city as Londinium to the Anglo-Saxons to the Tudors, every corner of London bears some history worth repeating.  The formally-walled “City of London” is the present-day financial center of the capital and is one of the 32 boroughs of London.  There are still places within The City, or Square Mile, as it is sometimes called, where you can see some of the London Wall, first built around The City by the Romans.  Just to the east of The City lies Whitechapel, the former stomping grounds of that vicious deviant Jack the Ripper, who killed at least five prostitutes in the late 1880s.  And on the other side of the River Thames (which throughout much of history, was wider than the present-day river running through London today), there is the George Inn in Southwark…a pub that can date it’s history back to the 17th Century.  Yes, that’s right…the 1600s.  No, the George we see today is not the exact same one from the 1600s, but there has been a pub on that site for almost 400 years!  That’s a lot of pints!

Lastly, let’s look at London’s cultural side.  Most major cities can boast opera houses and a smattering of theaters and maybe one or two concert venues.  But, London is the HOME of the stage production…with its West End surpassing our Broadway in both longevity, history and profitability.  Many famed Broadway productions began as West End productions…and many acclaimed actors and actresses got their start on the London stage.

As the Summer Olympics approach (the opening ceremonies are on July 27), we thought everyone might want to get into a LONDON frame of mind to prepare.  Here are some movies that might fit the bill:

Feature Films
  • 28 Days Later
  • 84 Charing Cross Road
  • Alfie (1966)
  • The Bank Job
  • Being Julia (historical)
  • Blow-Up
  • Bridget Jones’s Diary**
  • Children of Men
  • Closer
  • Croupier
  • Dial M For Murder (set in London, shot on a set)
  • Dirty Pretty Things
  • An Education
  • Finding Neverland
  • A Fish Called Wanda
  • Frenzy**
  • From Hell (historical London)
  • Gaslight (set in London, shot on a set)
  • Happy Go Lucky
  • Hobson’s Choice (set in London, shot on a set)
  • Incendiary
  • Indiscreet
  • The King’s Speech (historical London)
  • The Ladykillers (set in London, shot on a set)
  • Last Chance Harvey**
  • Love Actually**
  • The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) (not ENTIRELY set in London but features a climatic scene at the Royal Albert Hall in London)
  • Match Point**
  • Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day (historical London)
  • Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont
  • My Fair Lady (historical London) (set in London, shot on a set)
  • Notting Hill**
  • Patriot Games
  • Possession
  • Pygmalion (set in London, shot on a set)
  • The Queen**
  • Scoop
  • Shakespeare in Love (historical London)
  • Sherlock Holmes (historical London)
  • Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (historical London)
  • Sliding Doors
  • Stage Fright
  • Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (historical London)
  • That Hamilton Woman (set in London, shot on a set)
  • Vera Drake
  • Waterloo Bridge (set in London, shot on a set) (historical London)
  • Wimbledon**
  • The Winslow Boy (historical London)
  • Witness for the Prosecution (set in London, shot on a set)
  • The World is Not Enough (not ENTIRELY set in London but features a fantastic boat chase on the River Thames)
  • You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger
**MUST sees to get a good pre-Olympics feel of London

Television series

Above Suspicion
Absolutely Fabulous
Affairs of the Heart
As Time Goes By
Berkeley Square
Bleak House (2005)
Bless Me, Father
Bramwell
City of Vice
The Commander
The Complete Black Books
Coupling
The Duchess of Duke Street
Dutch Girls
A Fine Romance
Good Neighbors
The Hour
The House of Eliott
Hustle
Kavanagh Q. C.
The Last Detective
Law and Order UK
Manhunt
MI:5
Minder
Mr. Bean
Murder Investigation Team
Murphy’s Law
New Street Law
Prime Suspect
Poldark
The Prisoner
Rumpole of the Bailey
Secret Diary of a Call Girl
Sensitive Skin
Sherlock Holmes
State of Play (2003)
The Sweeney
Touching Evil
The Tudors
The Vice
Upstairs, Downstairs
Whitechapel
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