Breakfast-Review

Do we all have a dream? As human beings, we are very much susceptible to the pits of our own idealism. Lost in an imagined world of our own wonders leads us to question: What is true anymore? Sarah Combs’ debut book, Breakfast Served Anytime, questions the availability of dreams and the intangible journey of social navigation.

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Walt_Disney_Pictures

In the Oxford English Dictionary, a “classic” is defined as “something which is memorable and an outstanding example of its kind.”

Disney Masterpiece collections are just that, and the fact that multiple generations have watched these beloved classics proves that they can stand the test of time.

Today let the Niles Library take you on a journey to a time way before Frozen and High School Musical. Check out some of these Disney Animated Classics that we’ve been circulating in our catalog for decades:

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

Dumbo (1941)

Cinderella (1950)

One Hundred and One Dalmatians (1961)

The Aristocats (1970)

The Little Mermaid (1989)

Little Mermaid Book

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Tomboy-Review

As a young girl growing up in the 1980s-90s, cartoonist Liz Prince preferred wearing sneakers, a boys’ blazer and a baseball cap instead of wearing dresses. She role-played Ghostbusters with her guy friend Tyler, and played right field on her local little league team. This preference for “non-girly” things continued through her adolescence and is the subject of Tomboy, her new memoir for teens.

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hotel-review

Wes Anderson is not my favorite film writer/director working today. I find most of his movies pointless. They all seem to share a like vision but I guess I just do not understand or care about that vision. I can see what he is trying to do and I don’t want to bother. My favorite film of Anderson’s, The Darjeeling Limited, was less inane (in my opinion) than most of his films. But if there is one thing all of Andersons’ films share, it is that they are highly quirky. This might sound like I mean it as a bad thing – I do not. I like quirky. I just usually do not like Anderson’s brand of quirk. But in The Grand Budapest Hotel, the quirkiness works. Mostly everything works.

The best part of The Grand Budapest Hotel is the world Anderson creates. It’s unique, visually charming, and highly imaginative.

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teen-read-week

Each October, Niles teens celebrate the joy of reading for fun.

Check out the display case in the Commons area to view the Teen Advisory Board’s vision of “Turning Dreams into Reality.” What catches the eye (besides the cute Halloween Teddy Bear) are local teen author Joelle Charbonneau’s Young Adult novels. Niles Library has the honor of welcoming Joelle Charbonneau on Monday, October 13th from 4-6pm in the Large Meeting Room. Charbonneau is the author of The Testing, Independent Study and Graduation Day, a dystopian thriller trilogy.

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TBR2

The Hit by Melvin Burgess began with a promising concept: a drug called Death that plagues a society in the near future. This drug provides the victim with one week of pure bliss, including anything they could ever ask for in terms of riches, power, intelligence, and romantic partners – however, after the week is up the victim dies. As the story progresses the plot becomes extremely convoluted with the addition of several seemingly unnecessary characters and a subplot of a terrorist organization that manufactures fake death. The protagonists had superficial personas, which made them unrelatable and unlikable. The fast-paced nature of the novel kept me interested in the story, but it fell short of my expectations. The idea of a world obsessed with a particularly fatal drug had the potential to be the foundation for a thought-provoking book, however Burgess should have further explored the societal and emotional effects of such a drug in order for his book to live up its potential.

- Nicolette

The book is available for check out at the Niles Public Library.

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TBR3

Much like The Hunger Games and The Testing, The True Tale of the Monster Billy Dean is a dystopian novel centered around the aftermath of a war. Living in a town torn apart by war, William “Billy” Dean is an enigmatic child whose unknown powers guide him into a world of mystery. This novel is an exceptional story suited for adults but is admired by young adults as well. With a well-paced plot, David Almond tells the story using Billy Dean’s illiterate stance so the reader can get a glimpse into his mind. You get to watch Billy grow and see his perceptions alter. Patient readers will enjoy this book to its fullest potential and will revel in its perplexity.

- Kristjan

The book is available for check out at the Niles Public Library.

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TBR4

As a die-hard lover of young adult contemporary fiction, one of my favorite things about these books is when a character grips me so hard that I want to crawl through the book and just love him or her, and this is where I found myself with Torn Away by Jennifer Brown. While Jersey didn’t initially start out as a character with issues, it only took a few pages before she became one. I found myself so attached to her that I wanted to go to her and give her encouragement and support and just HELP HER THROUGH THIS TIME IN HER LIFE. She took over my heart while I was reading this book, you guys, because my heart was broken for her.

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TBR1

We Were Liars has been talked about all summer as the new trendy YA novel, and from first glance, it’s got all the right credentials: a prominently placed quote of praise from “Mr. YA” himself, John Green, an intentionally vague plot summary on the dust jacket that speaks of a “shocking surprise ending,” and photographic cover art. After I read it, however, it turned out to be a far more old-fashioned affair. It’s a psychological thriller from YA novelist E. Lockhart that tells the story of Cadence Sinclair, a wealthy 17-year-old girl who lives an idyllic life of golden sunsets and childhood adventure on an island off the coast of Massachusetts during the summer, until a mysterious accident changes everything.

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Teen-Read-Week

Niles teens voted for the best summer 2014 movie!

During the month of September, 117 teens picked which summer movie was their favorite. Teens voted for their best pick with small movie poster ballots that were affixed to a wall in the Teen Underground. Out of a field of eighteen picks, there were four top choices. The largest number of votes was awarded to The Fault in Our Stars with 23 votes, Guardians of the Galaxy with 17 votes, Maleficent with 15 votes and If I Stay with 14 votes. Both The Fault in Our Stars and If I Stay were adapted from Young Adult Fiction novels.

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